Bob Parsons® 16 Rules for Success in Business and Life in General

February 21st, 2013 by ToolGuy

1.

Get and stay out of your comfort zone.

 

I believe that not much happens of any significance when we’re in our comfort zone. I hear people say, “But I’m concerned about security.” My response to that is simple: “Security is for cadavers.”

2.

Never give up.

 

Almost nothing works the first time it’s attempted. Just because what you’re doing does not seem to be working, doesn’t mean it won’t work. It just means that it might not work the way you’re doing it. If it was easy, everyone would be doing it, and you wouldn’t have an opportunity.

3.

When you’re ready to quit, you’re closer than you think.

 

There’s an old Chinese saying that I just love, and I believe it is so true. It goes like this: “The temptation to quit will be greatest just before you are about to succeed.”

4.

With regard to whatever worries you, not only accept the worst thing that could happen, but make it a point to quantify what the worst thing could be.

 

Very seldom will the worst consequence be anywhere near as bad as a cloud of “undefined consequences.” My father would tell me early on, when I was struggling and losing my shirt trying to get Parsons Technology going, “Well, Robert, if it doesn’t work, they can’t eat you.”

5.

Focus on what you want to have happen.

 

Remember that old saying, “As you think, so shall you be.”

6.

Take things a day at a time.

 

No matter how difficult your situation is, you can get through it if you don’t look too far into the future, and focus on the present moment. You can get through anything one day at a time.

7.

Always be moving forward.

 

Never stop investing. Never stop improving. Never stop doing something new. The moment you stop improving your organization, it starts to die. Make it your goal to be better each and every day, in some small way. Remember the Japanese concept of Kaizen. Small daily improvements eventually result in huge advantages.

8.

Be quick to decide.

 

Remember what General George S. Patton said: “A good plan violently executed today is far and away better than a perfect plan tomorrow.”

9.

Measure everything of significance.

 

I swear this is true. Anything that is measured and watched, improves.

10.

Anything that is not managed will deteriorate.

 

If you want to uncover problems you don’t know about, take a few moments and look closely at the areas you haven’t examined for a while. I guarantee you problems will be there.

11.

Pay attention to your competitors, but pay more attention to what you’re doing.

 

When you look at your competitors, remember that everything looks perfect at a distance. Even the planet Earth, if you get far enough into space, looks like a peaceful place.

12.

Never let anybody push you around.

 

In our society, with our laws and even playing field, you have just as much right to what you’re doing as anyone else, provided that what you’re doing is legal.

13.

Never expect life to be fair.

 

Life isn’t fair. You make your own breaks. You’ll be doing good if the only meaning fair has to you, is something that you pay when you get on a bus (i.e., fare).

14.

Solve your own problems.

 

You’ll find that by coming up with your own solutions, you’ll develop a competitive edge. Masura Ibuka, the co-founder of SONY, said it best: “You never succeed in technology, business, or anything by following the others.” There’s also an old saying that I remind myself of frequently. It goes like this: “A wise man keeps his own counsel.”

15.

Don’t take yourself too seriously.

 

Lighten up. Often, at least half of what we accomplish is due to luck. None of us are in control as much as we like to think we are.

16.

There’s always a reason to smile.

 

Find it. After all, you’re really lucky just to be alive. Life is short. More and more, I agree with my little brother. He always reminds me: “We’re not here for a long time, we’re here for a good time!”

 

Terms of Reproduction of Bob Parsons® 16 Rules for Success in Business and Life in General

 “Copyright © 2004 Bob Parsons – http://www.bobparsons.me. All rights reserved. Reproduced with permission.”

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 Key Differences Between Super Networkers and Struggling Networkers

September 19th, 2012 by ToolGuy

Adapted to Network Marketing professional from Author: Beau Blackwell| March 24th, 2010

Original copy by: Mark Ling, Guest Author

Since I’ve been a successful network marketer for a long time and have coached many team members on how to be more successful, I thought it could be helpful write about the key differences that I see between the mindsets of super producers and those struggling.

If you have dabbled in MLM but aren’t making a killing yet, then you might find that some of the differences I mention below are issues you need to resolve first.

1. Super networkers take action towards their goals, while struggling networkers often procrastinate, or spend too much time overeducating or preparing themselves and not enough time DOING. Super networkers are usually prepared to fail fast and often, learning from their mistakes, rather than not making any progress at all.

2. Super networkers invest their money in conventions, marketing, and tool, and then spend what is left. Struggling marketers spend the vast majority of their money on other parts of their lives, and then invest what is left in their business.

3. Super MLM’ers invest their time in networking with and learning from other successful people, whereas struggling affiliates often try to work alone, or listen to people who have a negative influence on them. In addition, super networkers try to learn as much as possible from other successful people through books, audio, or DVDs. This is especially important when you’re not in a position or location where you can network with other successful network marketers face to face.

4. Most super network marketers understand the power of their mind and focus on developing strong self belief and an abundance mindset, whereas struggling networkers can get derailed by negative self-talk, focusing on what is going wrong in their lives and in their network marketing efforts.

I hope the above differences between super networkers and struggling networkers inspire you to upgrade your mindset and start thinking and acting like a super network marketers! Above all, make sure you follow point #1: super network marketers take action towards their goals.

All the best to your success!

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Golden Rules of Networking

November 15th, 2011 by ToolGuy

 You know the type. The people with obnoxious laughs, pushy pitches, and the ability to corner you at industry conferences and talk about themselves continuously for what seems like hours? The ones who clearly mean well, but their lack of etiquette can make you wish you hadn’t even gone?

Here’s a friendly suggestion: Don’t be that person.

Networking is a critical part of any MLM company, yet it’s probably the easiest thing to get wrong. Using living, breathing connections works better than blindly sending out pitches over the Internet, but for many, approaching people they don’t know for help finding or getting a sale is uncomfortable and nerve wracking.

Knowing a few etiquette guidelines can help you keep your conduct aboveboard, and perhaps ease a few fears about putting yourself in front of the well-connected.

Have a Solid Introduction

As most know, first impressions count heavily. Make sure your attire, attitude and overall appearance are the best possible before introducing yourself to someone.

If you’re at a networking event, pay close attention to the groups people have formed around the room. Join people who are by themselves, or a group of two or three whose positions provide you with a physical “opening” to jump into the conversation, says Ivan Misner, founder of California-based business networking organization BNI. Introduce yourself by clearly stating your name and making eye contact while you shake their hand, says Carol Goman, a nonverbal communication expert and author of The Silent Language of Leaders. Weak handshakes turn people off, so practice yours with a friend to make sure it’s neither bone-crushing nor wimpy.

If introducing yourself online, remember to follow in-person social etiquette rules. If someone referred you to the person, for example, put the mutual contact’s name in the subject line of the e-mail, so there’s an immediate level of recognition. Email is a cold medium. If you can warm it up with something personal, do so.

Don’t Confuse People with Your Pitch

No one needs to hear your entire company history upon meeting you. If someone asks you to tell them a bit about yourself, your explanation from start to finish shouldn’t take more than 30 to 60 seconds.

This is especially true when you’re networking with people who don’t work in your industry. Going into the nitty gritty details of your specific product and company will likely go over the head of someone who works in management consulting or marketing. Share what’s relevant, to your prospect.

Don’t Tell a Sob Story

No matter how tough it’s been, you need to paint a positive picture when you’re making new connections. Potential costomers or connections aren’t going to listen to people who are down in the dumps just to make them feel better.  They want people who project a good, can-do attitude, and who will be energetic and excited about the opportunity.

Complaining in general has no place in networking – whether it’s about unemployment, how tough your job is, or how bad your former company was. In this economy, people say ‘How’s business?’ and they’ll actually tell you. It doesn’t do any good to complain about how bad business or the economy is. People hate doing business with people who are grumpy.

Spend More Time Listening Than Talking

In this case, the old adage is true: People were given two ears and one mouth, and you should use them proportionately. Just like in the dating world, you should spend more time listening to and understanding the person in front of you than talking about yourself, says Mark Jeffries, a business communications consultant and author of What’s Up With Your Handshake?. “Once you have truly understood what drives this person, then you can introduce yourself and tell your own stories in a way that best fits their specific needs.”

Most people think that the really great networkers are extroverts, but extroverts don’t shut up. Talking about yourself is a good way to spread the word about who you are, but listening closely can help you form a deeper relationship with someone.

Avoid Being Socially Inept

There’s a fine line between being friendly and personable and being awkward. You do not want to be the latter.

Steer clear of talking about things that would make people uncomfortable. For example, don’t tell me that you were out of work for six months because you recently had brain surgery, or because you were laid off. People are going to feel as if they need to pity you, but you don’t want that to be the foundation of a relationship. Being vague about negatives – like saying you’re returning after a six-month medical leave, or after spending some time traveling – is a good way to keep the conversation on a high level.

You should maintain some normal social constructs, such as where you direct your eyes and how closely you stand to people. Looking from someone’s eyes to the middle of their forehead is professional, versus a more social gaze of eyes-to-mouth. You should also try to keep an arm’s length away from anyone you’re talking to.

Don’t Overstay Your Welcome

Taking up too much of someone’s time is almost as bad as ignoring them entirely.

It’s imperative that you understand when your time is up. You win in the social world if you ‘release people first,’ so if you see a slow crossing of the arms, an increase in the amount of time they’re looking over your shoulder, or a sudden obsession with the word ‘anyway,’ they are giving you not-so-subtle hints that they’d like to move on.

Have a few “graceful exits” ready. Examples: “It was a pleasure meeting you! There are a couple of other people here who I said I’d get it touch with while I’m here,” or “Is there anyone here I can introduce you to?” If you’re still lost, there’s always the standby “I’m going to run to grab another drink.”

Hand out Your Business Card, Not Your Resume

 Offline or online, you need to work on forming a relationship with someone before you ask them for anything at all. Many people overlook this professional courtesy.

Don’t ask strangers for a sale. You can’t ask someone to do a favor for you who you don’t have a relationship with. It’s unprofessional, tacky and ineffective.

Instead, go for the business card exchange. Make sure that when you offer yours, you specifically and politely request theirs. Don’t assume they’ll solicit it on their own. Once you’re a bit of a distance from them, take a minute to jot down a few notes about the person you just met on a sheet of paper – anything personal they may have mentioned, a news item you discussed, or a business idea you talked about. You can use that to politely jog their memory in a follow-up note.

Follow Up and Through

Perhaps the “Cardinal Rule” of networking is that once you’ve planted the seeds of a new relationship, you must follow up to maintain it. Whether it’s a business referral, sales lead, or a professional connection, get in touch – within 24 hours – to say you enjoyed meeting them.

No one owes you anything, so you need to be as ingratiating as you can. People who have taken the time to speak with you and provide you with connections or guidance deserve a thank you. Assume that you can learn from everyone. They might not be the right person, but they might know someone who you might want to be in touch with.It’s also critical to reach out to anyone a connection refers you to. People hate it when they give someone a referral and the person never bothers to follow up on it. If you don’t, it makes two parties look bad, he says – you, since you didn’t follow through on a potential lead, and the person who referred you, since they recommended you as a reliable resource.

 Adapted to MLM from the origianl article by Kelly Eggers

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Learn How to Attract People to You

October 5th, 2011 by ToolGuy

Attract people to youLet me start with this quote from Mike Oliver; “Techniques are many, principles are few, techniques may vary but principles never do.”

Don’t focus on script or learning exactly what to say, understand the concept.

First, you want to attract people to you. You want to learn how to become the hunted instead of the hunter. When you chase people they run away. It is a primal instinct. Everybody is trying to sell us something. “Take my card. Buy my stuff. Listen to this CD.”

What people are looking for is connection. They want to feel good and you can give this to them. Be a leader. It is all about you, not your company, not your products. People are staving for leadership. You have the skills already and you have skills that no one else has. You can attract people that I can not reach just because of who you are. You have life skills and experiences that others can relate to. You have the potential to be a leader but my question to you is this, will you accept the call? Will you study others? Will you find a way to bring them to you? Mike Dillard says “You must give without want in order to have.”  Never chase after people, you have so much to offer them!

You have all the knowledge in you already. Separate yourself from the pack and step into your power. Have the success mindset. Interview and qualify your prospect. Find out their reasons. Find their story. If you are in a reputable business, it is worth  millions of dollars,millions that others can be a part of. Money that can change their lives forever. Find out why they want in! Ninety five percent of them will say “No.” Only look for the 5% that want what you have. That is all you need to be massively successful in Network Marketing.

So let’s sum up. Get a “Yes” or get a “No”. Detach yourself from the outcome and stop selling. Become an information provider.

Attraction….Look at that word. The end is ACTION. Get out and just do it.

You CAN do this.

I believe in you,

Joe Sommese

TheNetworkBuilders com

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Reasons Why You May Not Be Recruiting and Sponsoring Anyone

May 17th, 2011 by ToolGuy

 Todd Falcone is an industry leader and has a proven track record helping Networkers build huge organizations. Here is the link to his page.  I surround myself with the top leaders and have been using Todd’s personal P.U.M.P coaching with great success. These are Todd’s 10 reasons why you may not be sponsoring the people you want to. It is a short list but very powerful suggestions. Note that the list is in no particular order.

  1. You aren’t really working.  Many people kid themselves into believing they are actually working when they really aren’t.  The big question is, how many people have you talked to in the past week about your business?  Be honest with your answer.

  2. You aren’t asking enough questions.  Start being more interested and more inquisitive.  Be genuine.  Focus on what they want.

  3. You’re scared.  Perhaps you may be over-thinking and letting your head get in your own way.  Stop the mental spin.  Just take action.

  4. You’re focused on the wrong thing.  People do this all the time.  They focus on themselves rather on what they can do for others.  Change your focus and change your results.

  5.  You’re too timid and worried about what they think.  Stop worrying about what others think.  Just do.  Maintain control.  Own it.  You have the deal.  Act like it. 

  6. You aren’t finishing.  Don’t be one of those people who start the process and not end it.  Your prospect is HOPING you call them back…at least the good ones are.  Don’t be a ball-dropper.  Follow up.  

  7. You don’t have the best deal on the planet, so stop saying you do.  No matter how good your company, comp plan or product is, STOP saying “We’re the Greatest!”  Put your feet back on the ground and take a breath of reality.  It’s fine to have a good product, comp plan, etc. without having to LIE and say you are the best thing since sliced bread.  Nothing screams scam more than hype. 

  8. You don’t believe.  This one kills tons of people.  You either don’t believe you’re worth it or that you aren’t capable.  You are!  You ARE worth it.  And…you ARE capable.  Stop the negative flow of energy.  It isn’t serving you.

  9.   You aren’t listening.  Start listening to your leaders, the ones who are REALLY producing and STOP reinventing the wheel because you think you are cool or good.  Make your first 10k a month their way and if you wanna go screw it up after that, you’re free.

  10. You’re scattered.  Focus on one company. Big produces don’t do multiple deals, so why should you.  Make sense?

, , , , , , , , , ,

Overcoming Shyness

March 4th, 2011 by ToolGuy

Dr. Bob of GoDaddy.com has a fantastic VBlog area on his web site. All the videos are good but sometimes one rises to the top. In our industry we have to talk to people. Shyness can kill your direct sales business before it ever gets the chance to take off. After all, we grew up with adults telling us not to talk to strangers. You get into a network marketing company and they say talk to everyone you see. The MARM, or Minds Automatic Response Mechanism instantly kicks in at the uncomfortable feeling from approaching strangers and we hear our parent’s warnings.

There are steps to take to overcome these feeling and overcome them you must if you are to succeed in direct sales. Try Dr. Bob’s advice and watch your business grow.

, , , , , , ,

Sell without Selling,Fear, Critisism or Objections

January 12th, 2011 by ToolGuy

, ,

Should I Prospect During the Holidays?

December 21st, 2010 by ToolGuy

Joe gives a video Tip From The Top about why you can keep prospecting during the Holidays and why people are open to your business idea.  See all the great videos  on YouTube/ MLMmatchmaker!

, , , , ,

Attract people to you, stop chasing.

December 4th, 2010 by ToolGuy

you can attract people to youLet me start with this quote from Mike Oliver; “Techniques are many, principles are few, techniques may vary but principles never do.”

Don’t focus on script or learning exactly what to say, understand the concept.

First, you want to attract people to you. You want to learn how to become the hunted instead of the hunter. When you chase people they run away. It is a primal instinct. Everybody is trying to sell us something. “Take my card. Buy my stuff. Listen to this CD.”

What people are looking for is connection. They want to feel good and you can give this to them. Be a leader. It is all about you, not your company, not your products. People are staving for leadership. You have the skills already and you have skills that no one else has. You can attract people that I can not reach just because of who you are. You have life skills and experiences that others can relate to. You have the potential to be a leader but my question to you is this, will you accept the call? Will you study others? Will you find a way to bring them to you? Mike Dillard says “You must give without want in order to have.”  Never chase after people, you have so much to offer them!

You have all the knowledge in you already. Separate yourself from the pack and step into your power. Have the success mindset. Interview and qualify your prospect. Find out their reasons. Find their story. If you are in a reputable business, it is worth  millions of dollars,millions that others can be a part of. Money that can change their lives forever. Find out why they want in! Ninety five percent of them will say “No.” Only look for the 5% that want what you have. That is all you need to be massively successful in Network Marketing.

So let’s sum up. Get a “Yes” or get a “No”. Detach yourself from the outcome and stop selling. Become an information provider.

Attraction….Look at that word. The end is ACTION. Get out and just do it.

You CAN do this.

I believe in you,

Joe Sommese

TheNetworkBuilders com

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Pushy Network Marketer

November 18th, 2010 by ToolGuy

I was sure guilty of the mistakes our poor salesman made. I prospected the the wrong people, did not listen to what the people were saying, kept pushing in the wrong direction, I kept looking for what was in it for “Me” not the prospect, I tried to sell before a relationship was established and on and on.

After many attempts to build my network marketing business like that I came up with the only logical answer, Network Marketing does not work. Sounds silly but that was how I felt. Then a friend and leader in the industry shared some insight and asked if I was teachable. I said yes and that was the beginning of my success in direct sales.

I learned to build a rapport with people, to go out and meet them and really listen to what they were talking about, he said to learn their children’s names and  ask where they lived, what they did for a living and if they were happy. Then and only then did I offer my solution to them if there was a need for it. I learned to recognise if there was a problem to be solved. Some people are just not looking for anything, some absolutely hate selling and MLM, and some could not afford to get started.

He taught me that many people need to build a second income from direct sales but not all wanted it. He said to find the few that want it, that they were the future leaders. He told me to find people with credibility, friends and associates and the money to get started. Go for the business owner, not the employee.

Know your business, know yourself and have posture. It does not take that many people to build a huge organization and help many people create huge incomes in our business. You can do this and ournew series on becoming an Alpha Networker will show you  how.

Yours in Success,

Joe Sommese

TheNetworkBuilders com

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

« Previous Entries

Subscribe in a reader

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Website Builder